High Fidelity by Nick Hornby

Source: purchased from Barnes & Noble

“Nobody worries about kids listening to thousands-literally thousands- of songs about broken hearts and rejection and pain and misery and loss.  The unhappiest people I know, romantically speaking, are the ones who like pop music the most; and i don’t know whether pop music has caused this unhappiness, but I do know they’ve been listening to the sad songs longer than they’ve been living the unhappy lives.”
– page 25, Riverhead Books, 1995

My lovely flagged copy of High Fidelity

What if everything was beyond your control?  What if everything was done to you, not by you, with you, or for you?  What if you lived as a slave to circumstances?  Would you have hopes and dreams? Would you be happy, or would you be miserable?  If you are Rob, the narrator and main character in High Fidelity then no, you do not have hopes and dreams, you are miserable, and you are also discontent and oftentimes a jerk.

It takes losing his girlfriend for Rob to come to this conclusion, and it takes the entire novel for him to sort out his feelings about this realization.  Many who read this book (and who see the American film version) think of this as a story about music, and sex, relationships, and manliness.  And it is these things.  But thankfully, it is not only these things.  In that case, it would only appeal to one audience (men) and that would hardly make it a good novel.

Among many references to pop music, all-time top five lists, and in-his-head narrations and obsessions about situations in Rob’s life (past and present), he takes the reader on an emotional journey of finding who he is, why he really is that way, and who he wants to be.  If we are honest readers, I think there is at least a smidgen (more or less for some) of Rob in all of us, regardless of gender.  Aside from being clever and funny, this book can give anyone a little thought-check, an assessment of the head space, and bring about an evaluation of how one chooses to react to the circumstances of life.

** I read and reviewed this novel by my own choice and was not asked to do so by the authors or publisher.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Oculus

we is experts.

Felix Pearce

speculative fiction from cambridge, uk

misslisted

Every single story has a beginning at its end.

A Crowded Bookshelf

This site is a way for me to share my love of literature, film and art with others.

BookBrio

bri·o (noun): vigor or vivacity of style or performance

Insights and Observations: Critical Meditations by D. L.McHale

“A writer takes the universal whore of language and turns her into a virgin again”

The Task at Hand

A Writer's On-Going Search for Just the Right Words

Innovations for Learning

It all starts with literacy.

tychogirl

Through binoculars / I leave my narrow world for / an ocean of stars.

Schietree

Writer, Reader, Kind of Spritely Looking

Cynthia Coleman Emery's Blog

Views on ways-of-knowing focusing on science, culture & media discourse, with attention on Indigenous knowledge

tin-can stilts

(& other things that prop us up)

Paul Bernal's Blog

Privacy, Human Rights, Law, The Internet, Politics and more

soul strikers

powerful moments in education

Deep Thinkings

It's time we start thinking about our lives

MonkeyMoonMachine

Teachings of a humble genius

Multo (Ghost)

Ghosts of story, myth, or anywhere else....

the attic room

"Like a nun withdrawing, or a child exploring a tower, she went upstairs...There was an emptiness about the heart of life; an attic room." -Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

Ilium Gazette

Writings and Rants

A Little Blog of Books

Book reviews and other literary-related musings

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

Laurie Boris

author, editor, proofreader, freelance writer

Shari Lopatin

Professional Rogue Writer

MIKE DELLOSSO

wide-eyed fiction

%d bloggers like this: